Ever since I got my credit card, I’ve had a serious online shopping addiction. I have a bad habit of liking to go on Ebay and AliExpress and buying cheap things from China. And it’s all. so. cheap. How could I resist the 3 dollar phone cases, and the free shipping (that takes a month). But one thing always leads to another, and before I realize it, I’ve spent a bajillion dollars.

On that note, the newest buy from my bajillion dollar sprees are these make up brushes !

IMG_0033.JPG

SUCH. A. GOOD. BRUSH. SET.

And the best part? This entire set of brushes costed me… oh I don’t know… 10 DOLLARS. YES YOU HEARD ME RIGHT GIRL, TEN. DOLLARS. How freakin’ unbelievable is that?!

And I know what your next thought must be. “How good could brushes be if they were ten dollars. PROBABLY SHIT QUALITY.”

But nope. These are damn nice brushes. You will not believe just how soft and well made these brushes are. They are really the bomb-dot-com.

IMG_0034.JPG

The reason I even noticed their brushes in the billions of seller posts was because they looked awfully familiar to me. Could it be? No…. But yes. These look just like some of the brush sets that are sold on some quite popular make up brands’ websites.

IMG_0028.JPG

Don’t believe me? Take a look.

BH Cosmetics’ set $20

Luxie Beauty Set $50

Look pretty similar huh? I haven’t tried the BH set nor the Luxie set, but honestly, I can’t imagine that they are much better quality than these babies right here. These synthetic brushes are beyond soft. I don’t know how they do it and are able to sell it for this great of a price, but man these brushes are SOFT. Comparing them with the very popular Real Techniques brushes, these brushes were pretty much on par, as far as softness goes. INSANE. ABSOLUTE INSANITY.

IMG_0030.JPG

Okay so let’s talk a little more about these brushes. There are 9 brushes in total. Four big kabuki face brushes, and 5 smaller brushes. All of these brushes are synthetic, so they could be used with liquid, cream, or powder products. That’s one thing I LOVE about the these brushes, is that they are so versatile. They could really be used for whatever you need it for.

I’m going to go through what the seller says each of these brushes are for, and then also tell you what I use them for.

IMG_0032.JPG

Let’s start with the big face brushes, from left to right.

1. Angled Kabuki brush – Buff cream blush, or bronzer onto the skin.

I agree with this one. I would probably use this brush for blending out and contouring with a cream bronzer. I would also maybe use this to blend foundation or concealer in the nooks and crannies of my face like under my eyes, around my nose etc.

2. Round Kabuki Brush – Blend mineral products onto the skin.

I could see that this brush would be great for buffing mineral foundation into the skin. I would probably even use this brush for buffing liquid or cream foundation into my face as well. This reminds me a lot like the Real Techniques buffing brush. However, this brush is just a little big smaller and a little more dense.

3. Flat Top Kabuki Brush – Application of liquid or cream products to flat areas of the face such as forehead and cheek.

This is probably my favourite brush out of the four face brushes. I use this brush to buff in my foundation (whether liquid or cream) for a perfect, flawless finish. I’ve used this a couple of times now, and it hasn’t disappointed me once. The way I use this is I actually use the flat top to spread, dab, and push the foundation into my skin before I start buffing it further. This way I find that my foundation not only lasts longer, but gives off a higher coverage. The brush is soft enough that it will bend to the shape of my face, and fit into that space under my eyes, and also around my nose.

4. Tapered Kabuki Brush – Apply cream or liquid foundations to the harder to reach contours of your face.

Once again, I agree with the description that the seller put out. I also used this brush for blending out my under eye concealer. I found that it fit into that little nook perfectly. So I even used it to set my under eyes. I think I like it better for setting then for blending under my eyes. because I do have quite dry skin, I find that my beauty blender does the best job when it comes to smoothing out my under eye concealer. But for setting, it works like a charm. I also used this same brush to set around my nose where it usually would be quite hard to reach.

IMG_0029.JPG

Now onto the smaller brushes.

5. Precision Flat – Stipple concealer onto sun spots, blemishes and other small imperfections.

This brush is quite similar to the flat top kabuki, but just a much smaller version. I agree that this would be the perfect brush for some spot concealing due to its size, but I also like to use this brush to put setting powder underneath my eyes, right where it usually creases, as well as around my nose. I find that using a smaller brush such as this one, helps me really blend that area out and make sure that there is minimal creasing.

6. Precision Tapered – Exact placement of concealer in hard to reach areas such as around the eyes, nose, chin, and mouth.

Another great one for spot concealing for sure, but I actually rather enjoyed using this brush to blend eyeshadow out underneath  my eyes. I found that the tapered end was great for adding colour on my lower lash line but because of the size and hairs of the brush, it also was great for blending and buffing that colour out to really smoke out the look.

7. Precision Angled – Apply products to areas such as the size of the nose, and hollows of the cheek.

This is definitely one that I would use to do some precision contouring. It would work great to contour your nose, or even to do a more precise contour on your cheeks. It is small enough that it would work really well applying the colour exactly where you want it to be, but it is still quite a soft and fluffy brush that gives you the power to blend out the colour perfectly as well.

8. Precision Flat Angled – Use for precision application of concealer anywhere on the face. Works particular well for around the eyes and nose.

Personally I used this brush for eyeshadow. Because it is smaller than the other angled brush, I found that it works really well applying darker colours into my outer v and crease area. The angled shape fits right into my crease, and made adding an extra bit of colour and dimension there easy. Not to mention it is soft and fluffy enough to help blend that colour in as well.

9. Precision Round – apply eyeshadow base, or primer onto the lid.

Like I said, because these brushes are all synthetic, they would work great for either wet or dry products. This one would definitely be a great one for applying your primer onto the lid, but I find that it’s even better for blending out eyeshadow in your crease. Because of the softness, fluffiness, and shape of this brush, I found that it fit in my crease like a dream. I’ve been using this brush mostly for adding a transitional shade into my crease, as well as blending any darker colours out to make sure there are no harsh edges. I think out of all of the smaller precision brushes, this one would have to be my favourite.

Overall, these brushes truly are AMAZING brushes. I don’t even want to add in the phrase “for the price” after that sentence because honestly… I would probably pay the retail brush of 50 or 60 dollars and still think these were worth it. So the fact that I paid about $10 for them absolutely BLOWS my mind away.

If any of you are looking for a new set of brushes, whether you’re a beginner, a freelance artist, or just someone like me who enjoys make up a butt load, PLEASE go check them out. I promise you will not regret it.

I’ll put the link here !

Let me know if you try these out, or if you’ve tried out similar brushes, and tell me what you think?

More soon,

Screen Shot 2014-02-04 at 1.58.15 AM